moulding london

see Mold

moulding london
Molding (process) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia For other uses, see Mold (cooking implement). This article needs additional citations for verification.
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(July 2015) (Learn how and when to remove this template message) One half of a bronze mold for casting a socketed spear head dated to the period 1400-1000 BC.

There are no known parallels for this mold. Stone mold of the Bronze Age used to produce spear tips. Ancient Greek molds, used to mass-produce clay figurines, 5th/4th century BC.

Beside them, the modern casts taken from them. On display in the Ancient Agora Museum in Athens, housed in the Stoa of Attalus. Ancient wooden molds used for jaggery & sweets, archaeological museum in Jaffna, Sri Lanka. Molding or moulding (see spelling differences) is the process of manufacturing by shaping liquid or pliable raw material using a rigid frame called a mold or matrix.1 This itself may have been made using a pattern or model of the final object. A mold or mould is a hollowed-out block that is filled with a liquid or pliable material like plastic, glass, metal, or ceramic raw materials.2 The liquid hardens or sets inside the mold, adopting its shape.

A mold is the counterpart to a cast.

The very common bi-valve molding process uses two molds, one for each half of the object.

Piece-molding uses a number of different molds, each creating a section of a complicated object.

This is generally only used for larger and more valuable objects. The manufacturer who makes the molds is called the moldmaker.

A release agent is typically used to make removal of the hardened/set substance from the mold easier.
Typical uses for molded plastics include molded furniture, molded household goods, molded cases, and structural materials.Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molding_(process)

Plaster done outside the house

Domestic stucco means the performance of various decorations on the walls or floors, the person responsible for the enforcement of such moldings can be used to do the different elements of walls and floors, also involved in duplicating the wall ornamental cornices and moldings.
Therefore, domestic stucco can be performed on both the outside and inside the house.

Plans for such a stucco home should be done even during the construction of the house, but it will be done at the end of all finishing work.

Plaster done outside the home can include adding to the elevation of certain decorative elements made of wood or plaster.
In contrast, performed inside a house can for instance be added to strips of decorative panels.

common moldings

There are a variety of common moldings: Astragal ? A semi-circular molding attached to one of a pair of especially fire doors to cover the air gap where the doors meet. Baguette ? Thin, half-round molding, smaller than an astragal, sometimes carved, and enriched with foliages, pearls, ribbands, laurels, etc.
When enriched with ornaments, it was also called chapelet.2 Bandelet ? Any little band or flat molding, which crowns a Doric architrave.
It is also called a tenia (from Greek ?????? an article of clothing in the form of a ribbon.2 Baseboard, "base molding" or "skirting board" ? used to conceal the junction of an interior wall and floor, to protect the wall from impacts and to add decorative features.
A "speed base" makes use of a base "cap molding" set on top of a plain 1" thick board, however there are hundreds of baseboard profiles. Baton ? see Torus Batten or board and batten ? a symmetrical molding that is placed across a joint where two parallel panels or boards meet Bead molding ? narrow, half-round convex molding, when repeated forms reeding Beading or bead ? molding in the form of a row of half spherical beads, larger than pearling Other forms: Bead and leaf, bead and reel, bead and spindle Beak ? Small fillet molding left on the edge of a larmier, which forms a canal, and makes a kind of pendant.2 See also: chin-beak Bed molding ? a narrow molding used at the junction of a wall and ceiling.
Bed moldings can be either sprung or plain. Bolection ? a molding which is raised, projecting proud of the face frame. It is located at the intersection of the different surface levels between the frame and inset panel on a door or wood panel. It will sometimes have a rebate (or rabbet) at the back, the depth of the difference in levels, so that it can lay over the front of both the face frame and the inset panel and can in some instances thus give more space to nail the molding to the frame, leaving the inset panel free to expand or contract in varying climates, as timber is prone to do. Cable molding or ropework ? Convex molding carved in imitation of a twisted rope or cord, and used for decorative moldings of the Romanesque style in England, France and Spain and adapted for 18th-century silver and furniture design (Thomas Sheraton)3 Cabled fluting or cable ? Convex circular molding sunk in the concave fluting of a classic column, and rising about one-third of the height of the shaft2 Casing ? Final trim or finished frame around the top, and both sides of a door or window opening Cartouche (French) escutcheon ? framed panel in the form of a scroll with an inscribed centre, or surrounded by compound moldings decorated with floral motifs Cavetto ? (Italian) cavare: "to hollow", concave, quarter-round molding sometimes employed in the place of the cymatium of a cornice, as in the Doric order of the Theatre of Marcellus.

It forms the crowning feature of the Egyptian temples, and took the place of the cymatium in many of the Etruscan temples.Źródło: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Molding_(decorative).

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